Pruning Is Like Cutting Hair: Prune Plants For The Terrified


There’s a lot of fear and mysticism around how plants should be pruned. This has dumbfounded some people who don’t even know where to start. I’m about to give you another answer. If you think of pruning a plant just like cutting your hair, the mystery will vanish, and it makes perfect sense for everything. That’s why I will equate the act of tapping your plant to cutting your hair. It is hike-through—a scaremongering tutorial. For most plants needing pruning, the time to do it is late winter or early spring.

Pruning Is Like Cutting Hair:  Prune Plants for the Terrified
Pruning Is Like Cutting Hair: Prune Plants For The Terrified

Most plants go dormant in winter so that pruning will be less stressful. At this time, making the cuts will help ensure that the wound is not exposed to disease or insects, and has time to heal before it begins to develop rapidly.

Think Of Cutting Your Hair

Think of that kind of like cutting your hair two weeks before your wedding instead of two hours before— you want to give it time to settle down and find its groove. It’s time for most plants that need pruning, late winter or early spring. Most plants go dormant in winter so that pruning will be less stressful. At this time, making the cuts will help ensure that the wound is not exposed to disease or insects, and has time to heal before it begins to develop rapidly.

Think of that kind of like cutting your hair two weeks before your wedding instead of two hours before— you want to give it time to settle down and find its groove. Think of this kind of like a trim job.

Pruning Is Like Cutting Hair:  Prune Plants for the Terrified
Pruning Is Like Cutting Hair: Prune Plants For The Terrified

Trimmed Hairs

Most people get their hair trimmed every few months to polish up their look. All those split ends, bad dye jobs, and heat damaged hair can disappear with the snip of the shears, leaving you with smooth and glossy locks. Pruning to maintain plant health is just the same; all the diseased parts, dead bits, and excess stems from your plant can be cut to bring it back to perfect health. First, examine your plant, seeking out anything that looks unhealthy, dead, spotty, or is in the process of browning.

These parts should be cut off; whether it’s a single leaf or a whole branch, it is best to clean out the damaged parts. Just like you would like to prune your plant into an appealing and natural shape when you get your hair cut. Would you catch stray hair locks and just start cutting willy-nilly, with no reservations about length or placement? You can not, of course! And neither does this on your plants. You want to have your cuts smooth, even, and well thought out.

Pruning Is Like Cutting Hair:  Prune Plants for the Terrified
Pruning Is Like Cutting Hair: Prune Plants For The Terrified

Conclusion Don’t leave stubs that stick out of the trunk, just like you wouldn’t let three longer hairs stick out of your bangs, go slowly and work purposely. You should remove branches or stems that are overcrowding plant areas, or make it look lopsided. Imagine what the plant would look like without this branch until you cut. Will form improve? Mind, you can not go back just as in hairdressing. Cautious preparation is essential.

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